Posts Tagged ‘Xbox 360’

Today’s post is about a cool Gaming Solution for all those Xbox & PS3 fans, have u ever felt schlepping your Xbox 360 or Ps3 around in your carry-on is a hardly ideal solution for platinum-level frequent fliers. Not only does it take up a significant portion of your roller, but once you get where you’re going there’s no guarantee that your hotel’s wood-paneled tube will know what to do with your high-end gaming machine.. Enter the GAEMS Portable Console Gaming and Entertainment System !! Yeah..

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This Portable Gaming Solution which carries not only an Xbox but also a 15-inch, 720p LCD in the lid, and speakers to boot. Flip open your console and you’re good to go, though I was wondering whether there’s room in there for the power brick too. I do know that your controllers will not fit, which seems like an unfortunate design choice if you ask me. The GAEMS suitcase ships sometime before the end of the year for around $250, and yes there are PS3 and new Xbox 360 versions coming too.. So what do you think !!

GAEMS Portable Gaming Suitcase

GAEMS Portable Gaming Suitcase

Now we are deep into the “next generation” of gaming and Video game consoles have come a long way in the 3 decades since they first appeared. They began as simple entertainment devices for some nerd hobbyists. Since then, gaming has ballooned into a mainstream, multi-billion dollar industry featuring graphical powerhouses like the Sony PlayStation 3, which can render millions of polygons per second. Systems have come and gone in meanwhile, and I thought it would be worth making a list of the “Top Five Best Video Game Consoles” today:

1) Microsoft Xbox 360 Elite

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While it’s neither a must-have upgrade for existing 360 owners nor as feature-packed as the PS3, the Xbox 360 Elite’s combination of top-notch gaming and digital media features make it the best game console of choice, it’s also one of the best ever !! The Xbox 360 doesn’t do anything particularly different from past systems, but it ranks high on the list for one reason: Xbox Live. Microsoft’s online platform proved that online gaming communities could thrive in the console space by not only creating a hub at which gamers could compete, but also a place to stream movies, download game trailers, and purchase both old and new games (as well as downloadable content) from the comfort of their sofas. The Xbox 360 is the prototype for online console gaming, and it’s just getting better..

2) Nintendo Wii

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If you don’t mind the dearth of HD graphics, the Nintendo Wii’s combination of motion-sensitive controllers, included Wii Sports titles, and emphasis on fun gameplay make the ultra-affordable console hard to resist and the best in it’s class, even in the early 90’s this is the system that turned every child into a gamer. Nintendo gaming systems not only had one of the largest libraries in gaming, but one of the most varied: action, sports, RPGs, shooters, and more were all well represented. Of course, it would be a grave misstep to overlook the home debut of the most important video game in history, Super Mario Bros, a first-party exclusive that made the NES the first true must-have video game console, other include The Legend of Zelda, Mega Man 2.

3) Sony PlayStation 3 Slim

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With a smaller design, more energy-efficient operation, lower price tag, and built-in Blu-ray and multimedia capabilities, the PS3 Slim delivers a compelling package for an affordable price for any gamer today, even the original PlayStation didn’t do anything particularly innovative (CD-based game systems had existed before its 1995 debut), but what Sony brought to the table with its first console was a level of maturity not seen in previous systems. Not only was it physically designed as a more living room-worthy entertainment component, but the games themselves saw more adult storytelling and darker themes. With the Sony PlayStation, gaming had finally grown up. The best of all were the games on Sony PS: Metal Gear Solid, Resident Evil 2, Xenogears. Love it!!

4) Sony PSP 3000 Ratchet and Clank Entertainment Pack

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While there’s probably not enough to get owners of previous the PSP to upgrade, newcomers will find the PSP 3000 to be a solid portable gaming and multimedia device. The PSP-3000 debuted in fall 2008, having made further modifications to its predecessor, the PSP Slim and Lite deductions to its weight and dimensions, while expanding its multimedia capabilities to include video-out and others. Its previous version, the PlayStation Portable, had proven highly successful, managing to sell more than 40 million units worldwide (as of August 2008) since its late-2004/early-2005 release

5) Nintendo DSi

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The Nintendo DSi is likely to be the final iteration of the venerable DS series of portable gaming consoles. Though the Nintendo DSi will abandon its backwards compatibility with the previous Nintendo handheld console, GameBoy Advanced, it does offer new media source compatibility with SD memory cards, greatly enhancing its ability to use other media. Along with strong improvements to graphic and video output and the incorporation of improved microphone technology and a built-in camera, the Nintendo DSi makes a very strong case for itself over the Nintendo DS Lite. While not all previous DS owners should upgrade, the DSi is an ambitious and solidly designed portable gaming system.

Have one on your mind, comment it out…

YouTube XL

YouTube XL

Bored of Boxee and Hulu Desktop now experience some TV-like viewing experience from YouTube XL that lets you sit back and enjoy Web videos from the couch rather than your computer chair and yes for free. YouTube XL brings the YouTube experience into the living room. Like Boxee and Hulu Desktop, the service provides a free, TV-like viewing experience that lets you sit back and enjoy Web videos from the couch rather than your computer chair. What you get out of YouTube XL depends on your hardware setup and the type of content you prefer. HD videos look fantastic, for example, but finding watching full-length shows can be a pain. YouTube XL delivers what it promises—but that’s not saying very much..

Unlike its two competitors, YouTube XL isn’t a separate downloadable application; it’s a Web interface optimized for the TV screen. Also intended for use with modern game consoles (like the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360) and Web-enabled TVs rather than your computer. For XL, YouTube opted for a big and blocky interface rather than a sleek, modern design. The controls are simplified and stripped of community features like comment threads. Site navigation is broken up into spotlight, top rated, most-viewed videos, and so on.

The search feature in YouTube XL doesn’t have an on-screen keyboard, something you’ll find in both Hulu Desktop and Boxee. (If you’re using a PS3 or Xbox, this isn’t a problem as the game console provides an on-screen keypad.) Plus, searching for full-length content rarely produced reliable results. For instance, you can easily watch old episodes of Alf after looking it up in YouTube’s Shows section, but searching for it on YouTube XL returned pages of clips instead of full-length episodes.

The service also doesn’t let you browse channels or subscriptions—two big omissions that would have added a ton of value to YouTube XL. There are some ways to work around these limitations, however. By clicking the Info button when watching a video, then clicking the screen name of the user who uploaded it, you can see all of that user’s videos. To find and watch full-length shows, search for them in the Shows section on the YouTube site and mark them as your favorites; then they’ll display in XL.
YouTube XL doesn’t match up to Hulu Desktop or Boxee, but it’s not trying to—its beauty lies in its ease of use, not its extra features. There’s nothing to download or install, and you don’t have to plug your computer into your TV. Just visit youtube.com/xl and you’re good to go.

Know Youtube 😉

Website: youtube.com
Location: San Bruno, California, United States
Founded: September 11, 2005
Acquired: October 9, 2006 by Google for $1.65B in Cash

YouTube was founded in 2005 by Chad Hurley, Steve Chen and Jawed Karim, who were all early employees of PayPal.