Posts Tagged ‘Search Engines’

Google’s main page may look simple, but don’t be fooled. Behind that solitary search box lies power that most of us never tap – not because we don’t want to, but because we don’t know how. But with the right commands and shortcuts, you can start using Google in ways you never imagined: as a calculator, a weather forecaster, a travel agent, movie locator, and much more. So let’s have a look at it, in this week post..

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The powerful way to refine your searches is by using search prefixes: words that you follow with a colon and then the search term itself. For instance, use the prefix ‘site’ to specify that you’d like to restrict your search to a particular site. The search phrase ‘site:microsoft.com windows xp downloads,’ for example, tells Google that you’d like it to retrieve links to downloads applicable to Windows XP from Microsoft’s web pages.

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You can use the ‘filetype’ prefix to search for specific types of documents or files. This is very useful if you’re searching for, say, Excel files – or for PDFs that you can download and print out in an attractive format. Let’s say, for example, that you’d like to search for a PDF of Ernest Hemingway’s novel The Sun Also Rises. The proper search phrase would be ‘sun also rises filetype:pdf.’ Other handy prefixes include ‘define,’ for searching for definitions, and ‘related,’ to search for sites that are similar to ones you like. The ‘define’ prefix is especially nice for students, young and old, who can instantly retrieve definitions of a word from a wide variety of sources.

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You can also perform targeted searches by using what Google calls ‘trigger words’ – or words that tell the search engine to return specific types of information, such as the local weather or local showtimes for currently running movies. Like search prefixes, some of these trigger words work best when they are followed by a colon and then by the relevant search phrase.

There are a couple dozen trigger words. Some of the more useful include ‘weather,’ ‘movies,’ and ‘tracking.’ For instance, a search for ‘weather:Berlin’ will quickly return the five-day weather forecast for Berlin, Germany, as well as dozens of related links to weather in that city. Use the trigger word ‘movie:*** brwill ask you for your location if you haven’t registered it already with the search engine. Once you provide that information, Google will instantly return a listing of movie theatres where the film is playing, along with showtimes. The triggers ‘film’ and ‘showtimes’ work identically, by the way.

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The Google search field is a veritable math genius as well. In fact, if you simply type a math equation in the search box, you’ll get nothing but the (correct) answer in return. Try it with a simple math problem first. Type 5 * 7, click Search, and Google shows you the result: 5 * 7 = 35. Math lovers can take the Google search field to the next level, too, with complex problems such as 5*9+(sqrt 10)^3. The answer, 76.6227766, is returned in the blink of an eye.

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Simpler conversions – such as for currency and temperature – are a cinch for Google, too. Need to find out how many dollars you can get for a certain number of euros? Easy. Just type, for instance, ‘400 euros in dollars,’ and you’ll have the answer even before you can finish typing ‘dollars,’ thanks to Google’s Auto Suggestion feature. Similarly, if you want to get a quick conversion from Fahrenheit to Centigrade, just type, for instance, ’98 f to c.’ Again, you’ll get the answer before you can finish typing. For a full guide to the signs and symbols that you can use with Google to perform mathematical calculations, see the Google Guide (http://www.googleguide.com/calculator.html).

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Use Google as a free proxy, What, your company blocks that hip new web site just because it drops the F bomb occasionally? Use Google’s cache to take a peek even when the originating site’s being blocked, with cache:example.com.

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You can add certain words to the end of search phrases in Google to unleash additional features. If you need a quick map, for instance, just type the word ‘map’ after the name of any country, city, or town. Google will display a thumbnail map, which you can click to explore in a larger, scrollable format using Google Maps. Similarly, to find an image of a search phrase, just add the word ‘image’ at the end of the phrase. For example, typing ‘Jefferson image’ brings up images of Thomas Jefferson. And adding ‘time’ to the end of the name of a city or country will result in Google’s telling you what time it is in that place.

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Remove affiliate links from product searches, when you’re sick of seeing duplicate product search results from the likes of eBay, Bizrate, Pricerunner, and Shopping.com, clear ’em out by stacking up the -site:ebay.com -site:bizrate.com -site:shopping.com operator. Alternately, check out Give Me Back My Google (original post), a service that does all that known reseller cleaning up for you when you search for products. Compare this GMBMG search for a Cruzer 1GB flash drive to the regular Google results.

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Make Google recognize faces, so you’re doing an image search for Paris Hilton and don’t want any of the French city, a special URL parameter in Google’s Image search will do the trick. Add &imgtype=face to the end of your image search to just get images of faces, without any inanimate objects. Try it out with a search for rose (which returns many photos of flowers) versus rose with the face parameter.

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And finally here is a list of my favorite Google advanced search operators, operator combinations, and related uses:

link:URL = lists other pages that link to the URL.

related:URL = lists other pages that are related to the URL.

site:domain.com “search term = restricts search results to the given domain.

allinurl:WORDS = shows only pages with all search terms in the url.

inurl:WORD = like allinurl: but filters the URL based on the first term only.

allintitle:WORD = shows only results with terms in title.

intitle:WORD = similar to allintitle, but only for the next word.

cache:URL = will show the Google cached version of the URL.

info:URL = will show a page containing links to related searches, backlinks, and pages containing the url. This is the same as typing the url into the search box.

filetype:SOMEFILETYPE = will restrict searches to that filetype

-filetype:SOMEFILETYPE = will remove that file type from the search.

site:www.somesite.net “+www.somesite.net” = shows you how many pages of your site are indexed by google

allintext: = searches only within text of pages, but not in the links or page title

allinlinks: = searches only within links, not text or title

WordA OR WordB = search for either the word A or B

“Word” OR “Phrase” = search exact word or phrase

WordA -WordB = find word A but filter results that include word B

WordA +WordB = results much contain both Word A and Word B

~WORD = looks up the word and its synonyms

~WORD -WORD = looks up only the synonyms to the word

For more you can visit:

Have more such tips and tricks u know using Google, post it in the comment section, so that I can check it out…

Microsoft Bing

Microsoft Bing

While Google slips in new features every few weeks, Microsoft favors the big launch, and for its major push into the search market that launch is today. For the past week, the tech press has been speculating that instead of using the project’s code name, Kumo, the final product would be called Bing; located at http://www.bing.com, will begin to roll out over the coming days and will be fully deployed worldwide on Wednesday, June 3.

It’s unlikely that Bing will unseat Google anytime soon, but its slick interface and tailored search results certainly give the search giant a run for its money.

Basically, Bing increases the chances that you’ll get the answer you need right on the results page, without the need to click to another site, which may not even have what you’re looking for. Foremost among new features that serve this goal is the “quick-page preview,” which displays text from pages in the results when you hover the mouse over the right side of a result’s entry. It’s one of those “why wasn’t that always there?” features that you quickly become dependent on.

Other ways Bing gets answers you want directly on its results page are in the results text and deep links. And you can search inside large sites or check FedEx or UPS tracking numbers from text boxes right in the results.

Interface wise rather than the blank white screen and logo that greets you on Google, Bing welcomes you with a beautiful, usually geographic but sometimes current-events-related image. The image loads after the search functionality, so it won’t prevent you from starting your search immediately. Live Search had these images, but with Bing you can go back and see all the ones from the last week. At the bottom of the home page you’ll see hot searches and travel and shopping topics, too.

Starting with this first search page, the consistency of interface begins: The left sidebar is always there to offer options, categories, and filters to fine-tune your search results. This is the case whether you’ve performed a video, image, or regular Web search. The consistency is welcome; other search engines use different layouts for each type of search.

Does Bing Have Enough Bling?

Microsoft has identified several of the problems with Web search as it stands today. Much of the time users are not really looking for a Web page but for an answer. By providing results that answer users’ questions immediately rather than requiring them to navigate to another page and back if the first one didn’t yield the info they were looking for, Bing brings value and efficiency to Web searches. I didn’t run into any cases where Google’s results were more relevant than Bing’s, So it’s unlikely that Bing will unseat Google anytime soon, but it’s a good thing for everyone to have more appealing choices, and some competition, when it comes to Web searching.