Posts Tagged ‘Mobile’

The mobile web has become mainstream, not all websites have kept pace with the eager throngs of mobile shoppers. After all, mobile traffic is projected to surpass desktop traffic by 2015 — the stakes couldn’t be higher for optimizing your site for mobile.

When a mobile user reaches your site, what is his or her experience? Is it as smooth as it should be? Are there images that won’t load? Text that’s too small or too big? Do users have to scroll right, then down, left and back up to find everything?

Never assume your traditional website renders well on mobile displays. A missed opportunity can cause brands to lose out on key opportunities and relationships.

As with any marketing effort, gathering metrics is the best way to determine what needs work when it comes mobile site performance.

Understanding the ABCs of Mobile Metrics

Before you can gather metrics, you need to know what to measure. Let’s start with the most popular analytics tracking software: Google Analytics.

Google’s digital marketing evangelist Avinash Kaushik organizes metrics into three groups (acquisition, behavior and conversion), which reflect the high-level purchase or conversion process of a web visitor.

By tracking each set of metrics for both mobile and desktop, overall traffic patterns emerge. You’ll begin to understand mobile performance in comparison to desktop performance.

1. Acquisition: The following three metrics track user acquisition from various sources. These represent the top end of the conversion funnel. Check all metrics across both mobile and desktop use.

Visits: How many people visit your website from either mobile or desktop?
Unique visitors: How many different people visited your website?
Pageviews: How many times was a page on your website viewed?
When comparing mobile and desktop performance, it’s important to realize that desktop is still the most prominent way to view websites. Therefore, people visiting on a desktop will view slightly more pages.

The most interesting tracking you can do is to observe how acquisition metrics change over time. Is mobile traffic growing on your site? Is overall traffic growing on your site? How is the ratio of mobile to desktop traffic changing?

2. Behavior: The next three metrics track user behavior, providing insight into whether a site moves users toward the outcomes it was built to achieve.

Pages per visit: How many pages are viewed during a single visit ob mobile vs. desktop?

Time on site: How much time does each visitor spend on your mobile website? On your desktop site?

Bounce rate: How quickly do mobile/desktop users turn away when they hit the site?

When we compare behavior metrics on the desktop site vs. mobile site, we see that visitors on desktop tend to delve slightly deeper than visitors on mobile and, consequently, stay longer on the site. Additionally, visitors on mobile are slightly more likely to bounce off the site (a “bouncer” is a visitor that visits only one page and then leaves).

Google explains how to understand user modes on mobile. The company classifies mobile users into three categories of interaction.

Repetitive now: These people track time-sensitive information on an ongoing basis, like stock quotes or sports scores.
Bored now: These people seek distraction or entertainment while waiting in line at the bank or on public transit, for example.
Urgent now: These people need location-sensitive information about a specific situation, such as the nearest pizza restaurant or the next available movie showtimes.

Understanding your mobile visitor’s “user mode” sheds more light on your behavior metrics over time. For example, a “bored now” visitor wants to be entertained; therefore, longer time on site indicates a satisfaction of that need. By contrast, a “repetitive now” visitor can have a high bounce rate, short time on site and low number of pages per visit, but it’s still a successful interaction.

3. Conversion: The last two metrics – conversion rate and average order size – track user conversions and the value of each of those conversions. These numbers show how visitors on both desktop and mobile contribute to an ecommerce site’s bottom line.

Conversion rate: How many visitors take the next step, whether to purchase, register or request more information?
Average order size: For ecommerce conversions, what’s the average dollar amount per order?

Most sites typically find that visitors on the desktop convert at a higher rate than mobile visitors. This is to be expected, as mobile web purchasing is relatively new and habits take time to establish.

Of course, mobile can still play a large role in the purchase process even if the transaction isn’t actually made on mobile. A recent Google study found that 79% of shoppers use their mobile device to shop, and 70% of them use mobile in-store.

Additionally, the velocity of purchases is significantly faster when a consumer is aided by a mobile device. Microsoft research found that shoppers who research products on their mobile devices are ready to buy; 70% take action within an hour, but 70% of people on desktop PCs take action within a week.

Impact of the Tablet

Any analysis of mobile performance has to factor in the tablet, which has quickly emerged as the third digital screen in consumers’ lives, in between desktops and smartphones. While smartphones are used on the go, at work and throughout the day and evening, the tablet is a lean back device frequently used at night.

What does this mean for your metrics? For starters, don’t consider all mobile devices equal. A shopper or searcher on a smartphone has markedly different needs and motivations than their counterpart who uses a tablet.

When you break your mobile metrics down between smartphone and tablet usage, you may notice trends. Perhaps tablet users visit more pages, spend more time on each page, and convert at a higher rate than smartphone users.

Being a constant companion, our cellphone is prone to accidents. It’s not tough to accidentally drop your cellphone on stairs, or from a table, or spill water on it. Then begins the nightmare of taking it to the company’s workshop. However, do you know if the damage is not much, there are some simple ways by which you can fix your mobile phone all on your own. So here is a list of simple quick fixes for cellphones.

    1) My Phone gets Wet

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Accidentally dropped your phone inside a water pool? It is almost dead. Chill, there is still a chance to revive it. Just remove the battery cover and put the phone in a plastic bag of dry rice. This may help you soak out the water from your phone. You can also put the bag out in sun for quick evaporation.

    2) Trackball malfunction

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Looking for an important email, and the trackball on your smartphone just refuses to scroll. It’s dust and dirt. Just like in a computer mouse, dust and dirt also make the movement of your trackball tardy. Just soak alcohol in a cloth and rub it over and around the trackball. Another way can be to pop out the trackball and clean it manually.

    3) Damaged charger

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An aging cellphone can often give tough time charging the device. Also, charging connector within the phone also at times gets damaged, loose or corroded. For mild corrosion, scrubbing the connector with a soft brush or a cloth soaked in alcohol can help. However, for damaged or loose connector one needs to visit the repair centre.

    4) Body scratches

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Got scratches on your mobile phone’s body, there is a simple way to get rid of them. Just do a light buffing with fine sandpaper. However, this may affect the shiny coating of your phone. Take care!!

    5) Scratched display

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Scratches on your phone’s screen gives you a tough time reading? Applying metal polish with a soft cloth may help here. Special scratch removal liquids and gels are also available.

    6) Phone gets Hanged

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Your phone often hangs? It simply refuses to respond. Here the first step is to switch off the device and power it again. In case this does not work, remove the battery and reboot it. Another way to restore it is to try connecting it to your computer. Also, look for instructions in your phone’s settings or menu. It might help.

    7) Cracked case

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Your phone’s case got cracks. But its working, so all seems to be fine. Not really, continuing with a phone with a cracked case can be damaging for your phone in the long run as it exposes your phone to dust and water. To protect it from further damage go for a close-fitting case.

Off-course there is other major damages which happens to phone which we need to work with a good mobile technician rather than spoil it out ourself.

Here I am back with one of the of the most annoying stuff, yes the promotional calls and hello tune calls you receive daily in your mobile from your service providers. Here is the way to stop these promotional/offers and advertisement sms calls from Airtel and Vodafone. 😦

How to Stop Advertisement Ads SMS & Calls to your Airtel & Vodafone Mobile
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Both Airtel and Vodafone users can sms START DND to 1909 (toll free) to stop these unwanted calls.
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    Stopping Advertisement Ads SMS & Calls for various providers:

Go to Do not Disturb Page to Stop unwanted calls for Vodafone users. Add your name, email and mobile number to this page and stop all unwanted promotional/offer calls.

Airtel prepaid and postpaid customers Do not Disturb Page

Airtel landline Customers use this Page. You need to put in your Airtel land line number, account number and email.

BSNL Do not Call registration – you need to be registered to use this service.

Idea Cellular – Post paid users need to be registered to use this service. Prepaid users just need to enter their number to stop unwanted calls.

Reliance Mobile – Do not call me, I will call you

Spice Karnataka – Sms START DND to 1909 or call 9844098440 and place a request.

Tata Indicom – sms START DND to 1909, or you can use the My account(for registered users) page for the same to stop promotional calls in your tata indicom mobile.

Finally you can work in Peace… 8).

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Oh yeah coming to the topic of how to trace a Mobile number its pretty simple as visiting this site – Indiatrace
You can not only trace mobile number but also your Vehicle number, Pincode, etc..

For Global Mobile tracking no problems here you go Global tracker

Hope this helps, catch you on my next blog..

So I am back with an intresting blog on ‘Smartphones” , yeah the one you geeky one always asked for “A miniature computer that has phone capability”. Ok, let me start with describing what a SMARTphone really is:

“Smartphone is a mobile phone offering advanced capabilities, often with PC-like functionality. There is no industry standard definition of a smartphone. For some, a smartphone is a phone that runs complete operating system software providing a standardized interface and platform for application developers. For others, a smartphone is simply a phone with advanced features like e-mail, Internet and e-book reader capabilities, and/or a built-in full keyboard or external USB keyboard and VGA connector. So as I said, it is a miniature computer that has phone capability

Now lets come to the main topic waht are the Best Smartphone available today by Operating System they have used, the answer defnitely varies and depends on what you most need your smart phone for. Do you need a device that excels at e-mail or one that’s optimized for browsing the Web? And will the best smart phone for e-mailing or browsing also keep you entertained on a long flight?…
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Lets start our Review with none other than “BlackBerry OS

Mobile to look for: BlackBerry Curve 8900

With its BlackBerry Bold, RIM showed us the way forward, while the touch-screen Storm changed the BlackBerry game entirely. But T-Mobile’s BlackBerry Curve 8900 is the best of both worlds. The 8900 packs a higher-resolution screen, an updated user interface, a faster processor, and integrated document editing. It also features the svelte form factor that’s a dead ringer for the small, sleek, and wildly popular Curve 8300 series. Our only complaint: No 3G radio. But free calls over Wi-Fi help soften the blow. Defnitely I say this is a true Champ 8) yeah!!
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O.S: Symbian

Mobile: Nokia E71

Lack of subsidized stateside carrier support has caused Symbian fans in the U.S. to lose out. But at least Nokia offers plenty of sleek, capable unlocked handsets to choose from. The Nokia E71 is the best of the lot—by far. It looks and feels expensive, has a very comfortable QWERTY keyboard, and offers comprehensive enterprise e-mail and document editing. Oh, and did I mention that it’s drop-dead gorgeous? 😉

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O.S: Windows Mobile

Mobile: Palm Treo Pro

Windows Mobile runs on so many handsets that it wouldn’t be fair or accurate to pick just one. Try using the HTC Touch Pro apart from Palm, a powerful, high-end slider with a five-row keyboard, full VGA (640-by-480-pixel) resolution, a touch screen, and a full complement of radios—though all these features are offset by an unintuitive interface. Palm scores big with its unlocked Treo Pro, a shrewdly specified enterprise Windows Mobile-based smartphone, even if the lack of a subsidized, carrier-backed version keeps mainstream users away.
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O.S: Palm OS

Mobile: Palm Centro

Alas, the Palm OS has been relegated to the history books. Consequently, there’s no reason to buy a Palm OS–powered handset today unless you’re looking for a real deal, in which case the entry-level Centro is a solid option. Fortunately, there’s plenty to look forward to on the Palm front: The forthcoming Palm Pre (Sprint), the company’s WebKit-browser–based handset, features a vertical sliding keyboard and an entirely new way to synchronize your contacts. From what we’ve seen so far, we think the Pre will be a master multitasker

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O.S: iPhone OS

Mobile: offcourse iPhone

This is one trend setter this days, the iPhone uses an operating system called iPhone OS, which is derived from Mac OS X. Third party applications were not officially supported until the release of iPhone OS somewhere if I remember in 2008. really not such a bad shot at all 😉

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O.S: Android

Mobile: Variants of HTC (Google Mobile)

This OS, though very new, already has a cult following among programmers eager to develop apps for its flexible, Open Source, back end. Android, which was developed by Google, has yet to own even a small part of the smartphone market because of its recent release date. Android is an Open Source, Linux-derived platform backed by Google, along with major hardware and software developers (such as Intel, HTC, ARM, and eBay, to name a few), that form the Open Handset Alliance. Not so bad the try with its feature, never used it though..
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None the least:

O.S: Linux

Mobile: Motorolo / Samsung Variants

Linux is strongest in China where it is used by Motorola , and in Japan, used by DoCoMo. Rather than being a platform in its own right, Linux is used as a basis for a number of different platforms developed by several vendors, including Google’s Android, LiMo, and TrollTech, which are mostly incompatible. Another platform based on Linux is being developed by Motorola, NEC, NTT DoCoMo, Panasonic, Samsung, and Vodafone, as I remember.
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So there we go ending another post as usual with some glitter.. I have also setup a poll to rate the O.S from your your view..

Happy Days, C U