Posts Tagged ‘Google Apps’

Project Tango: What is it ?

Posted: February 23, 2014 in All Categories
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What if you never found yourself lost in a new building again? What if directions to a new location didn’t stop at the street address? Imagine playing hide-and-seek in your house with your favorite game character. Imagine competing against a friend for control over physical space with your own miniature army.  The goal of Project Tango is to give mobile devices a human-scale understanding of space and motion.

The current prototype is a 5” phone developed by google containing customized hardware and software designed to track the full 3D motion of the device, while simultaneously creating a map of the environment. These sensors allow the phone to make over a quarter million 3D measurements every second, updating its position and orientation in real-time, combining that data into a single 3D model of the space around you.

It runs Android and includes development APIs to provide position, orientation, and depth data to standard Android applications written in Java, C/C++, as well as the Unity Game Engine. These early prototypes, algorithms, and APIs are still in active development.

Soon this technology would also be available on Google Glass.

Also they are looking for professional developers with dreams of creating more than a touch-screen app. These devices were built with the unique ability to sense 3D motion and geometry. We want partners who will push the technology forward and build great user experiences on top of this platform.

Currently, they have 200 prototype dev kits,  allocated some of these devices for projects in the areas of indoor navigation/mapping, single/multiplayer games that use physical space, and new algorithms for processing sensor data. Tell us what you would build. Be creative. Be specific. Be bold here They are expect to distribute all of available units by March 14th, 2014.

Eventually I think this could lead to a full 3D-map of every location that technology reaches throughout the world though.  but I’m not entirely sure that’s safe for privacy especially with all the buzz around it today.. What do u think  of it..

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Google Reader

Google Reader

Google has announced that it will be shutting down Google Reader on July 1, 2013 & iGoogle on November 1st 2013. 

This move comes as Google tries to consolidate its services to put more wood behind fewer arrows, we can expect more consolidation behind a few key products: Android, Chrome, and Google+.

Here you can find the list of  10 Free Alternatives to Google Reader http://www.fforfree.net/2013/05/10-best-free-alternatives-to-google.html

Worth the check….

I know Cloud computing is one of the most hyped technology trends of 2010, and foor better or for worse, cloud-computing technology is going to stay, on the other hand Small Businesses Are Clueless About Cloud Computing, did you know the fact that seventy percent of Microsoft employees are doing something at least related to cloud computing; in a year or so, that figure will be ninety percent.. Although cloud computing is not without concerns about security, stability, and data ownership, at its best it allows businesses to unshackle day-to-day operations from the local datacenter. Cloud computing is helping to shape today’s truly mobile workforce.

So how can Cloud Computing help for small businesses, or even in that case a startup, for small businesses, cloud computing hits a particular sweet spot. With cloud services, small businesses reap the benefits of not having to deploy physical infrastructure like file and e-mail servers, storage systems or shrink-wrapped software. Plus, the “anywhere, anytime” availability of these solutions, means hassle-free collaboration between business partners and employees by simply using a browser. In fact, it’s not a stretch to say that aside from a locally installed desktop operating system and browser, a lot of today’s small business technology needs can be fulfilled almost completely with cloud-based offerings.

For those who are not aware of what Cloud Computing is Exactly?

Let’s take a quick look at what constitutes a true cloud-computing solution. Cloud-computing services require no software to purchase and install. This doesn’t include a Java plug-in or some other kind of lightweight applet required to use the service. Cloud-computing fees for businesses are typically subscription-based. The vendors usually charge you on a month-to-month or annual basis. The solutions we feature here are relatively affordable and follow the subscription model. Another feature of cloud computing is that it’s easily scalable. Many of these solutions can work for a business with five employees or 5,000. Cloud-based service is nimble because it grows as your business grows.

Let we look at the twelve of the top cloud-computing services for small businesses, in today market under various categories..

    Cloud Computing for: Storage and Backup

Egnyte Hybrid Cloud Solution

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Cost: ~$19.98 – $69.98 Direct
One of the most pertinent concerns for a business of any size is storage and backup. Especially backup because, face it, your live business data is only as good as your last successful backup of it. For online backup and storage, it doesn’t get much better for SMBs than Egnyte. Egnyte’s Hybrid Cloud Solution offers a “file server in the cloud” so there’s no need for a physical file server. Egnyte has inherent disaster recovery and backup. It’s also a great way to get remote access to your files. You can opt to use Egnyte’s Local Cloud on NAS which will synch files from your online file server to a local NAS (not all NAS devices are supported, though).

Dropbox

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Cost: ~$4.99 – $49.00 Direct
Dropbox is a superbly implemented cloud-based automatic file-synchronization service that lets users share and store files online.

    Cloud Computing for: Productivity

Google Docs

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Cost: Free
Of course, productivity is key for a successful business. Online office suite Google Docs is elegant, efficient and provides document collaboration. Plus it’s more compatible with Microsoft documents than other online services of its kind.

Google Apps

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Cost: $50 per user per year Direct
If you want to integrate Google Docs into a collaborative workspace, complete with email and calendaring, Google Apps is the way to go.

Microsoft Office Live Small Business

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Cost: Free
Microsoft Office Live Small Business received an Editors’ Choice award, too. It gives SMBs the tools they need to conduct business online: 500 MB of storage, 1 year of domain registration, web-site building tools, business apps and more. It’s a powerful toolkit for small businesses on a budget.

    Cloud Computing for: Finance and Accounting

Outright.com

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Cost: Free
Keeping financial records and accounting are a necessary evil of running a business. Outright.com is an online accounting service that fits light accounting needs, such as tracking income expenses and tax obligations.

Bill.com

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Cost: $25 Direct, per month (1 user)
Bill.com smoothly automates small-business accounting by reducing the time and paperwork normally required for accounts payable, thus saving money.

    Cloud Computing for: CRM

Salesforce.com

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Cost: $65 to 250 Direct, per user per month
For dealing with customer accounts, Salesforce.com is a top-notch cloud-based CRM service. It provides a myriad of features like managing sales, marketing campaigns, and running reports.

    Cloud Computing for: Communication

DimDim 5.5

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Cost: $0.00 – $75.00 Direct
Communications are vital. Save money on business trips and installed phone-system costs with Dimdim This affordable, feature-packed Web conferencing solution is clearly a labor of love for its developers, and it gets better with each version. It covers all of your web and videoconferencing needs–plus, it’s fun to use.

Skype 4.0

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Cost: Free
Skype continues to improve its VoIP quality. Skype’s new interface makes video calls a priority and is the most intuitive out there. The new, efficient Silk audio codec produces class-leading sound for video and voice, earning Skype our Editors’ Choice for video calling.

    Cloud Computing for: IT Tools

Meraki WiFi Stumbler

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Cost: Free
Small businesses may not have the resources for an on-site IT staff. Meraki Wi-Fi Stumbler is an online wireless network analyzer that’s simple enough for anyone at your business to use. It provides information on nearby wireless access points, channels and signal strength allowing you to maximize your wireless networks efficiency.

LogMeIn Central

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Cost: $49.99 monthly; $299.00 yearly, Direct
LogMeIn Central is way to connect PCs via the Internet for tech support or for collaboration. It also gives a centralized snapshot of the health of PCs in your organization and it’s user-friendly enough for non-gurus.

    Cloud Computing: Database

Quickbase

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Cost: $250.00, Direct
Ultra-customizable, fast, and easy, Intuit’s QuickBase is the only business-class online database to come from a long-established vendor that a cautious company can trust. Editor’s Choice winner Quickbase, Intuit’s database can house any type of data from invoices to inventory. It’s fast, reliable, and has many native applications, so you can quickly get up and running.

I know this list may not cover all that you are aware of or currently using, comment them so others can have use with it.. Happy Week!!

Late Tuesday night, the Google Blog officially announced that the Google Chrome OS was a reality and would appear on netbooks some time later next year. So it seems now is the time where a lightweight contender with enough focus, and enough driving force could succeed in tipping the balance finally from desktop to web.

Google chrome OS

Google chrome OS

If you remember the very first Micrsoft WPF demos, they showed desktop applications which were email-able, inherently connected. At the time I considered these islands in the cloud, whether that was the future of apps, indeed it seemed silly to have to start an OS, to start a web browser, to start an app. Why not cut out the middle man (as does AIR). But this big old web-browser kept on being too useful, too good at connecting the dots, so it lingers. When you turn it into the OS, that doesn’t cut out the middle man, it cuts out the old guy that was behind him. Indeed most people don’t even know what the browser is/was.

Google Chrome OS is nothing new, from the Pogo of the 90’s, to linux netbooks of this decade, to the Crunchpad of next, we’ve seen these light-weight alternatives come and go, but this is a war of attrition, and it’s the users that are the grains of sand wearing down at the walls of the Fat Operating System, not the technology.

The announcement contained a thesis statement that is a bit more significant than it might appear at first: “It’s our attempt to re-think what operating systems should be.” That statement has both strategic and practical implications, which we’ll consider in turn.

From a strategic perspective, “what operating systems should be” clearly involves a heavy dose of Google-driven Web apps, from e-mail to spreadsheets. The entire OS will be focused on getting users into a Web browser as quickly as possible; any other applications will be secondary and probably not provided by Google. Instead, once the browser launches, users can do their computing via online applications, saving their data in the cloud

Google views this as computing nirvana for users, saying, “[Users] want their data to be accessible to them wherever they are and not have to worry about losing their computer or forgetting to back up files.”

But there are still a variety of applications that simply can’t be replicated within a browser, and consumers have had a mixed reaction to Google’s own apps, embracing Gmail but finding its presentation software to be severely limited compared to its desktop app counterparts. But the Chrome OS will be appearing first on netbooks, which can’t handle some of the more heavyweight desktop applications in the first place. And the new offering has the potential to drive users to rely on Google’s online offerings, which certainly would further the company’s goals.

Google expects this to be a a full fledged open source operating system built from the ground up. Its focus will be on speed, security and simplicity much like the Google Chrome web browser and Android OS.

I believe Google as a rich tech basket in themself the have a diverse portfolio of technologies to pick from. Their experience with Flash in Google Analytics and YouTube, HTML and JavaScript in applications such as Google Mail (primarily created using Java that outputs the HTML/JS), their open 3D plugin O3D, their Google Gears for offline storage of data, and of course HTML5 with JavaScript which is perhaps where we’ll see them lean should it reach sufficient fruition in the 2010’s.

Google says that they are working on making netbooks running Google Chrome OS for availability sometime in 2010 with the help OEM like HP, Dell, Acer etc… Your move Apple and Microsoft.