Archive for the ‘Home Tech’ Category

Get Things Done

Get Things Done

Always thinking of an easier way to get all your work done.  Share tasks, projects and files with anyone you work with. No more wait Do.com from SalesForce is here.

“Do” is a productivity site and app designed to help you get things done, and the next-gen of the service is launching in beta this week. Do.com (get it?) lets you create to-do lists and then assign tasks on that list to other people. Used for both individuals at home and businesses looking to streamline how they work, the service can be used to assign everything from bringing a bag of chips to a party to following up with a client to make sure he or she signs contracts on time.

The next generation of the service (it didn’t previously include social media contacts, for example) now offers integration into networks such as  Facebook, as well as into your contacts list.

If one of your contacts changes profile information, such as his or her employer, then that information will also be changed in Do.

Especially useful for businesses that repeat the same processes over time, templates can be created in Do that automatically assign recurring tasks to the appropriate people. For instance, one homebuilder is using Do to assign all of the tasks for building a home. Once a buyer makes a purchase, then assigning out the thousands of tasks involved in that process can be done in a single click.

Each task can be commented on, sending a message to both the person assigned to the task and the one doing the assigning. Mobile apps for iPhone and now Android allow everyone to keep up to date on what’s going on all the time, not just when they’re in front of a computer.

A Salesforce company, it’s not surprising that Do also has a huge component for sales teams. The beta version of the service has a new Deals component that can be used to track deals and revenue.

The full new version of Do is set to go live near the end of August. You can check out the beta by signing uphere.

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If you were thinking logging out of Facebook means the social network can’t track what you’re doing online? Think again..

Facebook has had privacy issues for a long time, and while the company has been working to improve its image, today’s episode will likely set it back once again. Thanks to a modified cookie, Facebook allegedly knows what you’re doing online even when you’re not logged in. Yes, Facebook uses cookies to track users even when they have signed out of the service. Evne though Facebook has denied allegations that it tracks users when they are logged out, saying it only uses tracking cookies to personalise content and to make the social networking site more secure.

An Australian technologist Nik Cubrilovic, recently claimed that when the user is logged out of Facebook, rather than deleting its tracking cookies, the site merely modifies them, maintaining account information and other unique tokens that can be used to identify its users. So Even if you are logged out, Facebook still knows and can track every page you visit on the web. Even Facebook admit that it alters, but does not delete cookies when users log out.

After running a series of tests analyzing the HTTP headers on requests sent by browsers to facebook.com, we can easily see that Facebook alters its tracking cookies the moment you log out, instead of deleting them. Since your uniquely identifying account information is still present in these cookies, Facebook can continue to track you.

This means that if you log out of Facebook, you’re not really doing much. If you then head to a website that contains a Facebook plugin, your browser will continue to send personally identifiable information back to Palo Alto. Here’s Cubrilovic’s a explanation on this:

With my browser logged out of Facebook, whenever I visit any page with a Facebook like button, or share button, or any other widget, the information, including my account ID, is still being sent to Facebook. The only solution to Facebook not knowing who you are is to delete all Facebook cookies. You can test this for yourself using any browser with developer tools installed. It is all hidden in plain sight.

So how do you get rid of these Facebook cookies in a way that will still let you use the service? Well, you can delete them every time after you log out of the website. Alternatively, Hacker News user buro9 says you can use the following AdBlock Plus rules:

facebook.com^$domain=~facebook.com ~facebook.net|~fbcdn.com|~fbcdn.net
facebook.net^$domain=~facebook.com|~facebook.net|~fbcdn.com|~fbcdn.net
fbcdn.com^$domain=~facebook.com|~facebook.net|~fbcdn.com|~fbcdn.net
fbcdn.net^$domain=~facebook.com|~facebook.net|~fbcdn.com|~fbcdn.net

This will supposedly limit your usage of the social network to just facebook.com. If you need to use it on another website, you can temporarily whitelist it with the AdBlock switch. If what Cubrilovic found today ends up being true, this could be a serious problem for Facebook. The advice is to log out of Facebook. But logging out of Facebook only de-authorizes your browser from the web application, a number of cookies (including your account number) are still sent along to all requests to facebook.com.

Even if you are logged out, Facebook still knows and can track every page you visit.

The only solution is to delete every Facebook cookie in your browser, or to use a separate browser for Facebook interactions.

Here is what is happening, as viewed by the HTTP headers on requests to facebook.com. First, a normal request to the web interface as a logged-in user sends the following cookies:

Facebook Cookie

Facebook Cookie

The request to the logout function will then see this response from the server, which is attempting to unset the following cookies:

Facebook Cookie Unset

Facebook Cookie Unset

To make it easier to see the cookies being unset, the names are in italics. If you compare the cookies that have been set in a logged-in request, and compare them to the cookies that are being unset in the log-out request, you will quickly see that there are a number of cookies that are not being deleted, and there are two cookies (locale and lu) that are only being given new expiry dates, and three new cookies (W, fl, L) being set.

Now If we make a subsequent request to facebook.com as a ‘logged out’ user:

Facebook Cookie Logout Call

Facebook Cookie Logout Call

The primary cookies that identify me as a user are still there (act is my account number), even though I am looking at a logged-out page. Logged-out requests still send nine different cookies, including the most important cookies that identify you as a user

This is not what ‘logout’ is supposed to mean. Facebook are only altering the state of the cookies instead of removing all of them when a user logs out.

With my browser logged out of Facebook, whenever I visit any page with a Facebook Like button, or Share button, or any other widget, the information, including my account ID, is still being sent to Facebook. The only solution to Facebook not knowing who you are is to delete all Facebook cookies. You can test this for yourself using any browser with developer tools installed. It is all hidden in plain sight.

The social networking giant said that the logged-out cookies are used to identify spammers and phishers, detect when an unauthorised person is trying to access a user’s account, help users regain access to an account when it’s been hacked and disable registration for underage users who try to re-register with a different birth date.

What is your thoughts on this, is Facebook justified to track logged-out users, Leave your comments in the comment section below:

The fact remains that Web is full of free website hosting services. There are number of hosting services on the web, and they are keen to provide free website hosting services for the eager ones. There was a time when free website hosting services was quite popular among the website owners.

Free Web Hosting

Free Web Hosting

Imagine, the extent of possible savings for a website owner, as the owner doesn’t have to shell even a single pie from the coffers, and the hosting is done free of cost.However, with the advent of cheap web hosting services, free website hosting services had gone out of the window. Still, free web hosting services remains a top catch for someone who has a low budget for his web ventures. There are many free web site promotion activities possible with free web hosting services. More importantly, you need to understand your site, and choose proper free web hosting services.

It’s important that the chosen hosting services do provide you with free website tools. Though, you won’t get all the required tools for building your website, but significantly, some of the free website hosting services has known to give enough free website tools to build your own website.Some of the free hosting services even go down to the extent of helping you to point the web address to the chosen domain name, and nevertheless, that are a handy free website tool.
The most significant criteria while choosing a free website hosting services is the bandwidth. Take pains to find the bandwidth such would offer you. In case, your free web site is provided with limited bandwidth, then your site might face access problems. You are advised to choose free website hosting services which allow you to have sufficient bandwidth for your site.
Now the advertisement section. For free hosting services, it’s the advertisement blocks that are perhaps, the most important consideration.
The focus for them is to earn money from placing advertisements on your site, but the real question is what type of advertisements do they intend to place on your site. Text advertisements are fine, but pop ups and pop under could be very annoying for your guest visitors. Money you, many guest decide to block your web address, just because your website has a pop up, or a pop under ads. Therefore, preferably, if possible, choose a free web hosting services that doesn’t place pop ups, or pop under ads. Following the above tips would ensure that you get the best free website hosting services for you site.

Here I have found a list of good free web hosting Companies in the below Link which i think is a good list for beginners for good free hosting:

http://bestwebhostsanddomains.blogspot.com/2011/06/top-10-free-web-hosting-for-2011.html

Alternate Link: http://top10webhosts.co.cc/
http://best10webhosts.co.cc/
http://besthosts.co.nr/

Let me know what do you think of free web hosting companies are they reliable and any good free web hosting companies you know which are not in the above list..