Archive for the ‘hardware’ Category

USB 3.0 devices are coming in thick and fast, ranging from external storage devices to media servers. Just getting one of these devices is not going to be enough to enjoy the significant increase in transfer speeds. Before investing in a USB 3.0 device, it is essential to have compatibility at the other end—namely, desktop and/or laptop.

null

I have put together a quick guide that lists the available upgrade options for the computer and then we round it off with some of USB 3.0 device that may be worthy of purchase.

Express card

null

This is by far the cheapest and quickest way to add USB 3.0 compatibility to your existing system. D-Link has PCIe riser card for desktop computers and an Express card for latops, with both of these offering two USB 3.0 ports.

The PCIe card for desktops can be had for Rs. 2,799 and the Express card for laptops is going for Rs 3,699.

Motherboard swap

null

The option to add native USB 3.0 support is only available for desktop computers, while laptop users will just have to save and buy a model with such support.

Getting a new motherboard is not going to be cheap, like the one pictured here from ASUS is selling for Rs 7,145.

This cost can go even higher as getting a new motherboard may also require getting a new central processor and memory modules, depending how old the rig in question is.

Pendrives

null

Transcend is selling a couple of USB 3.0 pen drives with decent storage capacities at an affordable price. The 8GB version of Transcend Jet Flash 700 is selling for Rs. 660 and the 16GB model is yours for Rs 1,099.

Portable hard-drives

null

Hitachi is offering quite an attractive package with its Touro series of external hard-drives. These USB 3.0 complaint hard-drives come in 500GB and 700GB models and in addition offer 3GB of online storage space.

The Touro Mobile Pro 500GB model has a suggested retail price of Rs 4,408 and the 750GB model’s SRP is Rs 5,309.

External desktop drives

null

While these drives are portable, they are likely going to stay put on your desktop. These drives are the mother of all external storage devices with the capacity of a data warehouse and need for an additional power source.

MyBook from Western Digital is a 3.5-inch external drive with capacity to house two terabytes of data. This one is retailing for Rs 4,900 and is backed-up by three years of warranty.

Advertisements

Everyone loves their music on the move, and so we all need a good pair of headphones, the best music sounds even better with some of the cool headphones available in the marketplace. Here’s a list of the best headphones I think is worth the Mention.

Sony MDR-570 LP

null

If you’re after a pair of great-sounding on-ears at a bargain price, look no further. With decent bass, bags of detail and a musical balance that embarrasses more expensive designs, they’re better than they have any right to be. And they look great, too. Price: ~$60.

Phonak Audeo PFE 012

null

It’s not easy creating the perfect headphone. Music is so subjective that one human’s perfect pitch is a little lacking in bass for another, and too brightsounding for pedant no.3. The PFE 012s do about as good a job of satisfying disparate tastes as any in-ears we’ve tried. Building on the success of the pricier 111s, they dig up bags of detail, deliver sweet vocals and a palpable soundstage, and up the bass to party-worthy levels. They’re also barely-there lightweight and subtly attractive. They could easily sell for twice the price. Price: ~$80.

Klipsch Image X10i

null

Though the X10s were our favourite in-ears for years, the X10i now looks too pricey for the no.1 spot. Built-in iPod/iPhone controls are useful, but it’s the sound and size that really impress – the buds are slim as lolly sticks but sound thrilling and insightful. Price: ~$250.

Sennheiser CX300-II

null

Thanks to amazing price reductions, the CX300-IIs represent even better value for money. Replace your bundled headphones with these and you’ll find out what you’ve been missing: deep bass, sparkling detail and dramatic dynamics. You’ll thank us later. Price: ~$60.

Powerbeats by Dr Dre

null

We never had Dr Dre down as a fitness fan, but the headphones he’s designed for sweaty gym sessions are seriously impressive. Expect powerful, weighty and dynamic sound, then be pleasantly surprised by the in-line mic and three-button iPhone remote. Price: ~$300.

Ultimate Ears TripleFi 10vi

null

Offering audio that’s full-bodied and punchy, with excellent levels of detail, the 10vis will stay firmly nestled in your lugholes thanks to a shapeable over-ear band. With phone controls on-hand , they’re a marvellous choice for affluent iPhone owners. Price: ~$600.

Bose QuietComfort 15

null

Bose’s latest long-haul headphones are its finest yet. Wearing a pair is as comfortable as binding pillows to your head with silken thread, and both sound and noise cancelling are exemplary. For a louder, more rocking listen, try Monster’s Beats Studio. Price: ~$450.

Shure SE535

null

Your eyes don’t deceive – that is how much Shure’s flagship three-driver IEMs cost. They look and feel it, though, with a thick, replaceable cable that attaches to the buds via articulated joints. And the sound? Unbelievably detailed, utterly uncompromising. Price: ~$750.

Sennheiser PX310 BT

null

Here we have an excellent pair of noise-cancellers that are a significant step above ordinary budget headphones. Smooth, crisp and balanced sound along with Bluetooth capability and a powerful enough battery make this a winner. Price: ~$550.

AKG K701

null

With a swanky headphone amp, these reference-quality , openbacked headphones create a sound to rival hi-fi speakers ten times the price. Got more dosh? Try the supremely revealing Sennheiser HD 800s or breathtaking Grado GS1000is. Price: ~$450.

What’s you best headphone, leave a comment in the comments section of this post.

null

Have you ever caught into the trouble of phone’s battery going low when you most needed it or you thought it will always stick to specifications provided by your phone manufacturers. Think again. Today’s smartphones have a multiplicity of applications and functions running in the background, many of them unnoticed by the user.

That is, until they drain the phone’s battery dry. At first, it’s not so easy to tell why one’s new top-level smartphone gives up the ghost after only two hours. But the fact of the matter is that, being online all the time has its price and some modern applications really do eat up battery time.

But, it doesn’t take much to let the good times roll again. A few simple tricks can turn a smartphone back into a marathon runner. Indeed, there are a few apps out there to help extend a phone’s life.

Screen illumination, satellite navigation systems like GPS (satnav) and data transfers via UMTS are among the most energy- intensive functions out there, says mobile expert and freelance author Daniel Lueders.

Thus, one easy way to conserve battery life is to change screen illumination settings to the lowest level, something done simply enough with most phones.

But that leaves accessing websites via UMTS and navigation programmes like Google Maps to eat up your battery life. One tip is to make sure that navigation software is turned off as soon as a destination’s coordinates are found. Otherwise, the mapping software can continue to run in the background, leaving a smartphone drained after two hours, says Lueders.

If you’re willing to only use a phone for calls, even if only for a short time, then deactivate your UMTS function. The same goes for wireless functions. “Otherwise the gadget is permanently looking for accessible networks,” says Lutz Labs, an editor at German technology magazine c’t.

Many smartphones that use the Android operating system include a page on their settings menu that shows which applications use the most energy. When underway, a good idea is just to switch to airplane mode, which turns off the satnav system, says Lueders. That’s especially true when travelling on a stretch with a lot of tunnels, since the smartphone will burn up a lot of energy looking for a provider.

“You can quickly double or triple your battery life with these kinds of steps.” Labs demonstrated how radically a smartphone’s power consumption can vary. In airplane mode, a Motorola Milestone used 6.4 milliwatts. But, when uploading data via UMTS and taking a video, power consumption shot up to 3 watts – meaning power usage went up by a factor of 500.

Even a five-minute activation of the display can cut standby time in airplane mode by up to six hours. It also happens that smartphones sometimes give up the ghost after only a few hours when taken abroad. Most of the time, this is because the smartphone is looking for its usual provider in vain, says Lueders.

That problem is solved by turning off the automatic search function and setting up a connection manually. Another idea is to turn off the automatic downloading of emails and manually direct the smartphone to download them, also saving energy.

There is also a host of new, smaller apps designed to help save energy. The free app Juice Defender provides Android phones with automatic settings designed to extend battery life, says Labs. The software determines if one is home or in the office and then activates functions based upon one’s location, turning off unneeded ones.

Here are more Tips to save your phone battery life:

Turn off all off all unnecessary sounds (keytones, alerts). One of my biggest pet peeves is how most phones these days come with keytones on. Do people really like hearing their phone beep, strum a musical note, or chime every time they press a button? You might like it, but ask your neighbor. Plus, turning these off will save you a good amount of battery juice. Think of all of the processing it must take to load up those midis (or whatever they are) when you touch a key – plus, they’re annoying.

Use either a ringer or vibrate, but not both. I understand if you’re in a concert or loud party you want to increase your chance of actually realizing your phone is ringing, but other than that, pick one or the other. There’s no need to have your ringer all the way to the point where it has both the sound and vibrate alerts active, so I would recommend against it. I personally have my phone on vibrate at all times, regardless of where I am. If you’re worried about not hearing your phone when it’s on vibrate, put it on a table and I promise you’ll hear it. Or better yet, put it in a dish full of coins!

Decrease your screen’s brightness to 50% or Use a black Background. Go to the settings menu of your phone and change the LCD brightness. At first, the screen will look dark, but once your eyes have adjusted to it, you’ll forget about it. The LCD screen on your phone is one of the biggest (if not THE biggest) power hogs on your phone. So turn it down, and you’re on your way to a lengthier battery life.

Turn your backlight setting down. Most phones these days will allow you to adjust the amount of time your backlight stays on once you’ve stopped touching buttons. The default length on most phones is probably around 15-30 seconds, but there are settings that are much lower. I would suggest turning this down to 3-5 seconds to increase your battery life. If it starts annoying you, then just crank it back up. Note: Mine backlight is set to go off after 5 seconds and it doesn’t bother me at all.

Turn off Bluetooth when you’re not using it. This can be an easy one to forget about if you’re often switching between using a Bluetooth headset, and the phone’s ear piece. Turning the Bluetooth off when you’re not using it will save your phone from having to go out and check if the headset is there every few seconds. Any type of transmission will weigh-down your battery life, so if you use infrared, turn that off when you’re not using it as well.

Close applications when you’re not using them. This one only affects those of us that have smartphones. Why do you need to keep that game on pause when you’re not using it? Or pocket Excel open? Just save and close them and you’ll minimize the amount of battery waste.
Keep your phone in cool climates. I know most of the time you won’t have a choice where to keep your phone – since it goes with you at all times. But when you do have a choice – such as when you’re at home – don’t put your phone on the hot stove, or on your super hot MacBook Pro or anything like that. Also, don’t keep your phone in a hot car. If you have extra batteries for your phone, go ahead and store those in the refrigerator – but make sure not to freeze them. BatteryUniversity recomments storing them at a 40% charge for best results.

When you’re phone is done charging, unplug it! There’s a common myth that you can over-charge your battery if you leave it plugged in. According to BatteryUniversity, “Once the battery is fully charged, no further charge is applied.” So if no further charge is applied, then why do you need to unplug your phone? You want to protect your battery from heat, that’s why. When the phone is running off of AC for a long time, extended heat may hurt the battery.

Avoid over heating of the battery to prevent damage to the mobile phone and to the battery. Keep your phone away from the direct Sun heat and any other radiations. Your phone battery works fine in the temperature range of 10 – 35 C.

Don’t let your battery fully discharge. If you let your battery die frequently, you’re putting extra strain on the battery. Avoid this by plugging in your phone before it dies all the way.

Don’t do anything fun on your phone. I mentioned this above, but I’m serious here. If you have fun on your phone, your battery life will dramatically decrease. Accessing the web, playing games, navigating via GPS and capturing photos or video are not things to do while you’re in the middle of nowhere without a charger.

Use One SIM Only Mobiles: The reason not being still clear why a single SIM mobile uses lesser energy than a dual SIM phone, which by using logic, I believe, will depend on the number of times that you switch between the SIMs. This transformation is a task that will use both software and hardware changes, which might be the reason for more power consumption. So always use single sim only mobiles for longer battery life!

With 2011 touted as the year of the tablet, the tablet war has begun with Apple unveiling iPad2 and BlackBerry-maker Research In Motion (RIM)speculated to be following soon with its PlayBook. Here’s is my point of view on how Apple Inc’s iPad 2, stacks up against iPad 1 and competing tablets, with just simple features and less jargons so everyone can understand with a scroll :0.

Apple iPad 2

null

* Price: $499-$829

* Camera: Has front and rear-facing camera, Sports a magnetic cover

* Weight: 1.33 lbs (603gm)

* Screen: 9.7 inches LED display; width: 7.3 inches; depth: 0.34 inches

* Processor & OS: Runs on 1GHz dual-core A5 processor, iOS 4.3

* Availablity: March 11

Apple iPad

null

* Price: $399-$729

* Weight: 1.5 lbs (680gm)

* Screen: 9.7 inches LED display, width: 7.5 inches, depth: 0.5 inches

* Processor & OS: Runs on 1GHz A4 processor

Motorola Mobility Xoom

null

* Software: Android

* Weight: 1.6 lbs (725gm)

* Camera: Has a 2 MP front-facing camera for video calls and a 5 MP rear camera that takes still photos and captures high-definition video.

* Screen: 10.1 inches diagonally; width: 6.6 inches; depth: 0.5 inches

* Processor & OS: Runs on 1GHz Dual Core processor with Android 3.0 Honeycomb

* Availability: Since February

* Price: $600-$799

Research In Motion PlayBook

null

* Screen: 7 inches display; width 7.6 inches, depth 0.4 inches

* Weight 0.9 lbs (408 gm)

* Camera: Dual camera, 3 MP camera in the front, 5 MP camera at the back

* Processor & OS: Runs on 1 GHz dual-core processor with BlackBerry OS

* Price: To be announced

* Availablity: March likely

LG Optimus Pad

null

* Weight: 630 grams

* Screen: 8.9 inches display

* Processor & OS: 1GHz NvidiaTegra 2 dual-core processor, runs on Android 3.0

* Camera: Two separate cameras on the back for shooting 3D video. A 2 MP camera on front for conferencing.

* Price: To be announced

* Availability: Middle of March

Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1

null

* Screen: 10.1 inches display

* Weight: 1.3 lbs (589gm)

* Camera: Front- and rear-facing cameras

* Processor & OS: Runs on 1 GHz dual-core processor with Android 3.0 Honeycomb

* Price: To be announced

* Availability: March

HP TouchPad

null

* Screen: 9.7 inches multitouch screen

* Weight: 1.6 pounds (0.7 kg)

* Camera: There’s a front-facing 1.3 MP camera for video calling. However, there is no camera on the back panel.

* Processor & OS: Qualcomm Snapdragon dual-CPU APQ8060 1.2-GHz processor; will be the first to use WebOS OS which HP got when it acquired Palm.

Price: To be announced

Availability: Middle of the year likely

I always experiment with my Wi-Fi and now I think I mastered 10 different things other than connecting to the Internet with my Wi-Fi and I am sharing the same in this week post, having the ability to connect to the internet anywhere we go is undoubtedly awesome, but it isn’t the only gift Wi-Fi technology has given us. So let’s see the Ten other Things you can do with your Wi-Fi other than connection to your Internet..

null

1) Make DTH signal go the distance

Monsoon Multimedia’s Vulkano is a device that connects to (and controls) your existing DTH set top box (STB). It has to be set up so that the STB outputs to the Vulkano, while the Vulkano is connected via HDMI to the TV.

You can watch TV normally, but Vulkano also lets you stream your existing TV, which you’ve already paid for, to any internet-connected PC, Android phone or iPad/iPhone/iPod Touch. Whether you’re within your Wi-Fi connected home, or anywhere in the world, you can connect to the Vulkano box, switch on the STB and watch or record live TV.
If you have a recorder like I am using TataSky+, the Vulkano box can also be used to schedule a recording on it. At $280, this is a cool new way to make your TV channels go the distance.

2) Turn webcams into surveillance cameras

An app called iCam ($4.99) for the iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch can be used to remotely monitor your home when you are away. You need to install the free iCamSource software (available for Windows & MAC) on each laptop or PC that you want to use, and then configure it to the iCam software in a simple , two-step process.

You can configure up to 12 different webcams with each iPhone, and view the feeds from four of them simultaneously. Like a high-end surveillance system, iCam also offers push notifications. The app continuously monitors the camera feeds for movement. If movement is detected, a message will pop up informing you of the same.

3) Share Net connection using Wi-Fi

Free program called Connectify turns your Windows 7 machine into a Wi-Fi hotspot. Download Connectify from connectify.me and set it up by giving your Wi-Fi network a name and password, just as you would with a regular Wi-Fi router.

So whether your laptop is connected via Ethernet or to a USB broadband modem, you can share internet with other nearby laptops or devices like Wi-Fi enabled phones, iPods and tablets. Similar functionality can be found on smartphones like the Samsung Galaxy S and HTC HD2; both have built in software that lets you share your GPRS connection with other Wi-Fi devices in the vicinity.

4) Transfer photos from digicam to PC

Imagine a memory card for your digital camera that never ran out of space. That’s what the Eye-Fi wireless SD can do for you. The card packs in regular flash memory and a Wi-Fi adapter into a standard SD card that can fit many digital cameras.

When you first get it, you need to configure the card to your Wi-Fi network by connecting it to a PC. You can also configure it with Flickr, Picasa, Evernote, YouTube, Snapfish, Photobucket and many more. When you get within range of your configured Wi-Fi network, photos and videos stored on the card will automatically get transferred to your computer or connected site. The 4GB Eye-Fi SD card is available for 3,800 (including customs & delivery) from eBay Global Easy Buy program. Note: Although Eye-Fi is supported by over 1000 camera models, before buying, do check the compatibility list on the company website. and also similarly you can Send photos to digital photo frame, The iGala Wi-Fi photo frame looks just any other 8-inch photo frame. But it’s actually pretty advanced. Based on Linux, the touchscreen can be used to configure it to your Wi-Fi network. Sign in to your Flickr account on it to instantly have it display photos from your stream.

You could also use it just like any other photo frame, by displaying images from the 1GB built in memory or external SD/USB devices. Available from Thinkgeek.com for $240.

5) Make your own portable Wi-Fi hotspot

You may not always have an available Wi-Fi connection to get your fix. However , with the help of a handy new device, you can create your own Wi-Fi hotspot wherever you go.

The Tata Photon+ Wi-Fi is a small, battery-powered device that connects to Tata Photon’s broadband network (just like the USB device) and instantly creates a portable Wi-Fi hotspot that can be used by up to five devices at a time. It also has a single Ethernet port to connect to a desktop or laptop without Wi-Fi . Buy the device for 6,499 and choose from a number of different plans starting at 500 per month.

6) Monitor entire house with Rovio

This is the coolest thing which I borrowed from one of my friend, Rovio is a toy, but a pretty advanced one at that. The battery-powered, camera-toting and Wi-Fi enabled Rovio will wait patiently at home for your command. Connect to it from a remote location, and you’ll see what Rovio sees.

You can also move Rovio around and use it to communicate with other people thanks to the built in speaker and mic. Teach Rovio your home’s layout by setting waypoints and Rovio can navigate to those preset locations all by itself. And Once Rovio’s battery is depleted, it can automatically back itself into the charging dock at home. Available from Thinkgeek.com for $199

7) Stream Audio to Any Speakers in the House

While you need extra PCs or game systems lying around to stream video, streaming audio is a cinch with something like Apple’s AirPort Express router. Even if you’re not streaming from iTunes, Apple’s AirPort Express will get any music to any speakers you want in the house. You can even create your own portable, wireless boombox. Of course, if you’re not an Apple fan, you can always use a regular old router to make a wireless music player, too. And, of course, it works the other way, too—you can always stream music from your iPod or iPhone to a computer with iTunes.

8) Share Files with Nearby Computers

If you’re sharing something other than video between PCs, you have a bunch of options for transferring them. While it isn’t the absolute fastest method, sharing files over the same Wi-Fi network (or an ad-hoc network if you’re out and about) is certainly one of the easiest ways to get files from one computer to another. Of course, if the friend with which you’re sharing files is a Dropbox enthusiast, you can transfer files over Wi-Fi with Dropbox as well.

9) Forward Notifications from Your Smartphone to Your PC

If you’re rocking an Android phone (and most of you are), you can send call, SMS, and battery notifications straight to your Windows, Mac with Growl, or Linux PC over Wi-Fi with Android notifier. No more do you have to deal with the ringing and buzzing phone from across the room when you’re already sitting at your PC. If you prefer to be able to take action on these items, you can always forego the Wi-Fi and send them over GTalk with TalkMyPhone instead.

10) Turn Your Smartphone into a Remote Control

If all the computers in your house are connected to a Wi-Fi network, you can easily connect your smartphone to the same network and control them. With apps like our favorite iTunes-controlling Remote app for iPhone, the all-encompassing Gmote for Android, and more XBMC remotes than you can shake a stick at, you don’t have to get up from your couch for anything anymore.

What other ways are you using your Wi-Fi connection, Let me know, Leave your Comments in the Comment section of this post, Have a Great Week….

Wonder what are the hottest technologies for 2011? Technologies and trends that will rule in the year 2011. Let’s take a look at this week post, 10 Hottest & Strategic Technologies for 2011. The list highlights the technologies and trends that will be strategic for most organisations in 2011. strategic technology as one with the potential for significant impact on the enterprise in the next three years. A strategic technology may be an existing technology that has matured and/or become suitable for a wider range of uses. It may also be an emerging technology that offers an opportunity for strategic business advantage for early adopters or with potential for significant market disruption in the next five years. Here’s over to the top 10 strategic technologies for 2011.

null

Mobile apps and media tablets

Mobile devices are becoming computers in their own right, with an astounding amount of processing ability and bandwidth. There are already hundreds of thousands of applications for platforms like the Apple iPhone, in spite of the limited market (only for the one platform) and need for unique coding. Many research estimates that by the end of 2010, 1.2 billion people will carry handsets capable of rich, mobile commerce providing an ideal environment for the convergence of mobility and the Web.

Cloud Computing

Cloud computing services exist along a spectrum from open public to closed private. The next three years will see the delivery of a range of cloud service approaches that fall between these two extremes. Vendors will offer packaged private cloud implementations that deliver the vendor’s public cloud service technologies (software and/or hardware) and methodologies (ie, best practices to build and run the service) in a form that can be implemented inside the consumer’s enterprise. Many will also offer management services to remotely manage the cloud service implementation.

Next-gen analytics

Increasing compute capabilities of computers including mobile devices along with improving connectivity are enabling a shift in how businesses support operational decisions. It is becoming possible to run simulations or models to predict the future outcome, rather than to simply provide backward looking data about past interactions, and to do these predictions in real-time to support each individual business action.
While this may require significant changes to existing operational and business intelligence infrastructure, the potential exists to unlock significant improvements in business results and other success rates.

Fabric-based infrastructure and computers

A fabric-based computer is a modular form of computing where a system can be aggregated from separate building-block modules connected over a fabric or switched backplane. In its basic form, a fabric-based computer comprises a separate processor, memory, I/O, and offload modules (GPU, NPU, etc.) that are connected to a switched interconnect and, importantly, the software required to configure and manage the resulting system(s).

The fabric-based infrastructure (FBI) model abstracts physical resources – processor cores, network bandwidth and links and storage – into pools of resources that are managed by the Fabric Resource Pool Manager (FRPM), software functionality. The FRPM in turn is driven by the Real Time Infrastructure (RTI) Service Governor software component. An FBI can be supplied by a single vendor or by a group of vendors working closely together, or by an integrator – internal or external.

Context-Aware computing

Context-aware computing centers on the concept of using information about an end user or object’s environment, activities connections and preferences to improve the quality of interaction with that end user.
The end user may be a customer, business partner or employee. A contextually aware system anticipates the user’s needs and proactively serves up the most appropriate and customized content, product or service.

Storage Class Memory

Huge use of flash memory in consumer devices, entertainment equipment and other embedded IT systems. It also offers a new layer of the storage hierarchy in servers and client computers that has key advantages – space, heat, performance and ruggedness among them.

Unlike RAM, the main memory in servers and PCs, flash memory is persistent even when power is removed. In that way, it looks more like disk drives where information is placed and must survive power-downs and reboots. Given the cost premium, simply building solid state disk drives from flash will tie up that valuable space on all the data in a file or entire volume, while a new explicitly addressed layer, not part of the file system, permits targeted placement of only the high-leverage items of information that need to experience the mix of performance and persistence available with flash memory.

Social analytics

Social analytics describes the process of measuring, analyzing and interpreting the results of interactions and associations among people, topics and ideas. These interactions may occur on social software applications used in the workplace, in internally or externally facing communities or on the social web. Social analytics is an umbrella term that includes a number of specialized analysis techniques such as social filtering, social-network analysis, sentiment analysis and social-media analytics. Social network analysis tools are useful for examining social structure and interdependencies as well as the work patterns of individuals, groups or organizations. Social network analysis involves collecting data from multiple sources, identifying relationships, and evaluating the impact, quality or effectiveness of a relationship.

Ubiquitous computing

The work of Mark Weiser and other researchers at Xerox’s PARC paints a picture of the coming third wave of computing where computers are invisibly embedded into the world.

As computers proliferate and as everyday objects are given the ability to communicate with RFID tags and their successors, networks will approach and surpass the scale that can be managed in traditional centralized ways. This leads to the important trend of imbuing computing systems into operational technology, whether done as calming technology or explicitly managed and integrated with IT.
In addition, it gives us important guidance on what to expect with proliferating personal devices, the effect of consumerisation on IT decisions, and the necessary capabilities that will be driven by the pressure of rapid inflation in the number of computers for each person.

Social communication and collaboration

Social media can be divided into:

1. Social networking-social profile management products, such as MySpace, Facebook, LinkedIn and Friendster as well as social networking analysis (SNA) technologies that employ algorithms to understand and utilize human relationships for the discovery of people and expertise.

2. Social collaboration technologies, such as wikis, blogs, instant messaging, collaborative office, and crowdsourcing.

3. Social publishing-technologies that assist communities in pooling individual content into a usable and community accessible content repository such as YouTube and flickr.

4. Gaining feedback and opinion from the community on specific items as witnessed on YouTube, flickr, Digg, Del.icio.us, and Amazon

Video 2.0

Video is not a new media form, but its use as a standard media type used in non-media companies is expanding rapidly. Technology trends in digital photography, consumer electronics, the Web, social software, unified communications, digital and Internet-based television and mobile computing are all reaching critical tipping points that bring video into the mainstream.

Over the next three years video will become a commonplace content type and interaction model for most users, and by 2013, more than 25 percent of the content that workers see in a day will be dominated by pictures, video or audio.

Do you predict any Hot Technology trend for 2011 which is missed out, let us know…

I previously posted on the top 10 HDTVs and one of my friend asked me to have a post about the top 10 best laptop around today, also bcoz he is buying a new one and he got no better person than me to research on it ;). Offcourse the most common question we get around is simple: “What laptop should I buy?” Being a generally difficult person by nature, I usually respond with my own series of questions, why do you need a laptop for, whats your cost range, what screen size u need, what other features and they go on and on…But sometimes people just want a simple suggestion, based on what I actually like. So, here is a jargon-free list of the current crop of laptops that I’m digging, either because they give you good bang for your buck, they excel in their specific category, or because they just plain rock. I have not listed out the e2e specs and price, which you could easily find it out on the web..

Dell Inspiron 15R/14/17

null

This is the Value for money laptop from Dell you can go either go for 14/15R/17 I think they are equally good, It’s among the basic ones in the market but still got quite good hardware which includes core i3 processor from Intel with 3 GB of RAM.On demand graphics card and increase in battery life by upgrading to 9cell lithium battery.
Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo T6600 (2.2GHz), RAM: 4GB (!), Hard Disk Size: 320 GB, Display: 14″ High Definition Wide Screen, Battery Life: 6.5 Hrs. Operating System: Windows 7 64 bit OS

HP Pavilion dv7-4183cl

null

The HP Pavilion dv7-4183cl’s new components, including a faster Core i5 processor, 6GB of DDR3 memory (from 4GB), and bigger battery, are more dominant than anything else you can buy at this price. Sexy metallic design. Even bigger battery now, which delivered 6 hours of battery life. Big, bright screen. Spacious, fast 500GB drive. Blu-ray drive included. Terrific speaker system.

Sony VAIO VPC-Z1390X

null

The Sony VAIO VPC-Z1390X is, hands down, the lightest and most powerful ultraportable money can buy. It lead medium budget market when it comes to the look and feel of the device, but lags on the hardware front where as it’s competitor give much better hardware in the same price. Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo T9900 (3.06GHz), RAM: 4 GB, Hard Disk Size: 250 GB, Display:Battery Life: 6.5 Hrs, Operating System: Windows 7 Premium 64bit

Macbook Pro

null

Not a big deal on Apple, but by far is the best Laptop in the market. Not because of the hardware it provides but because of the features, final product finishing and combinations it offers. Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo (2.26 GHz), RAM: 3 GB, Hard Disk Size: 250 GB, Display: 13.3″ With 1280 x 800 Resolution, Battery Life: 7 Hours (!), Operating System: Mac OS Tiger

HP Compaq 6730b

null

Compaq Presario is a value for money laptop and HP has sold lot of these equipments. It’s better finished as compared to it’s competitor Dell Studio. Processor:Intel Core 2 Duo P8600 ( 2.4 GHz)
RAM: 2 GB, Hard Disk Size: 320GB, Display:15.4″ WXGA BrightView display, Battery Life: 6 Hrs, Operating System: Windows 7 Pro :

Acer Aspire

null

The Acer Aspire AS5745-7247 is one sweet laptop deal, putting in parts and features you don’t normally get at these prices. A $600 laptop, for instance, will usually use a budget processor like an AMD Athlon or Intel Pentium and a hard drive no bigger than 320GB, But Aspire comes with Fast Core i3 processor. Great battery scores. Whopping 640GB of storage. Lightweight. Excellent user experience.

Gateway ID49C13u

null

The Gateway ID49C13u seduces with an aluminum design that not many can pull off for $850, let alone put in premium components like a Core i5 processor and Nvidia Geforce GT 330M graphics. Powerful Core i5 processor. Switchable graphics with a good Nvidia chip. Inexpensive. Four USB ports. Great battery life.

Toshiba Satellite T235-S1350

null

Toshiba’s latest CULV-equipped laptop, the Satellite T235-S1350, has all the key laptop essentials for an unbeatable price. Very aggressively priced. Exquisitely thin and lightweight. White design is vibrant. Excellent battery life. HDMI and eSATA included. Excellent keyboard. Wide touchpad.

Dell Latitude E5510

null

The affordable Dell Latitude E5510 business laptop comes complete with a durable frame, excellent user experience, and the performance you would expect from a Latitude laptop. Inexpensive, for the Latitude line. Durable chassis. Excellent keyboard. Soft mouse buttons. The 1,600 by 900 resolution. Good processor for the money. Huge battery delivered 7 hours.

Lenovo IdeaPad V460

null

Lenovo IdeaPad V460 have Intel Core i5-450M-HM55 processor and Windows 7 Professional 32bits , 1.3 Mega pixels Camera, 4 Giga Bytes DDR3 (1066MHz) RAM, 320GB 5400rpm HDD, 14.0 HD LED Glare and 6 Cell.This laptop is reasonably good on hardware front but it’s looks and battery is what really pushes it backwards, and there is no customisation option for the same. This is a medium budget laptop.