Archive for the ‘Gadgets’ Category

Wacom introduces Inkling, a new digital sketch pen that captures a digital likeness of your work while you sketch with its ballpoint tip on any sketchbook or standard piece of paper.

By the way I was thinking what about our tablets that we bought..

iPhone 5 Rumour Roundup

Posted: August 12, 2011 in All Categories, Apps, Firmware, Gadgets
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iPhone 5 (or the iPhone 4S, as some are calling it) rumours are flying thick and fast already.

Let’s raid the iPhone 5 rumour fridge to find the tomatoes of truth amid the stinky stilton of baseless speculation.

The iPhone 5 is coming. Maybe it’ll land in September, maybe October, maybe some time after that, but sooner or later Apple is going to release a sequel to the wildly successful iPhone 4. That successor might have a larger screen, NFC, a slimmer design, or any number of other features… if the rumors are to be believed. Before every launch we hear all sorts of rumors/leaks and some of them inevitably end up being true, so while we take everything we hear with a healthy dose of skepticism, it’s still worth it to pay attention.

What top features do you want to see in the next generation iphone..??

USB 3.0 devices are coming in thick and fast, ranging from external storage devices to media servers. Just getting one of these devices is not going to be enough to enjoy the significant increase in transfer speeds. Before investing in a USB 3.0 device, it is essential to have compatibility at the other end—namely, desktop and/or laptop.

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I have put together a quick guide that lists the available upgrade options for the computer and then we round it off with some of USB 3.0 device that may be worthy of purchase.

Express card

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This is by far the cheapest and quickest way to add USB 3.0 compatibility to your existing system. D-Link has PCIe riser card for desktop computers and an Express card for latops, with both of these offering two USB 3.0 ports.

The PCIe card for desktops can be had for Rs. 2,799 and the Express card for laptops is going for Rs 3,699.

Motherboard swap

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The option to add native USB 3.0 support is only available for desktop computers, while laptop users will just have to save and buy a model with such support.

Getting a new motherboard is not going to be cheap, like the one pictured here from ASUS is selling for Rs 7,145.

This cost can go even higher as getting a new motherboard may also require getting a new central processor and memory modules, depending how old the rig in question is.

Pendrives

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Transcend is selling a couple of USB 3.0 pen drives with decent storage capacities at an affordable price. The 8GB version of Transcend Jet Flash 700 is selling for Rs. 660 and the 16GB model is yours for Rs 1,099.

Portable hard-drives

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Hitachi is offering quite an attractive package with its Touro series of external hard-drives. These USB 3.0 complaint hard-drives come in 500GB and 700GB models and in addition offer 3GB of online storage space.

The Touro Mobile Pro 500GB model has a suggested retail price of Rs 4,408 and the 750GB model’s SRP is Rs 5,309.

External desktop drives

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While these drives are portable, they are likely going to stay put on your desktop. These drives are the mother of all external storage devices with the capacity of a data warehouse and need for an additional power source.

MyBook from Western Digital is a 3.5-inch external drive with capacity to house two terabytes of data. This one is retailing for Rs 4,900 and is backed-up by three years of warranty.

Everyone loves their music on the move, and so we all need a good pair of headphones, the best music sounds even better with some of the cool headphones available in the marketplace. Here’s a list of the best headphones I think is worth the Mention.

Sony MDR-570 LP

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If you’re after a pair of great-sounding on-ears at a bargain price, look no further. With decent bass, bags of detail and a musical balance that embarrasses more expensive designs, they’re better than they have any right to be. And they look great, too. Price: ~$60.

Phonak Audeo PFE 012

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It’s not easy creating the perfect headphone. Music is so subjective that one human’s perfect pitch is a little lacking in bass for another, and too brightsounding for pedant no.3. The PFE 012s do about as good a job of satisfying disparate tastes as any in-ears we’ve tried. Building on the success of the pricier 111s, they dig up bags of detail, deliver sweet vocals and a palpable soundstage, and up the bass to party-worthy levels. They’re also barely-there lightweight and subtly attractive. They could easily sell for twice the price. Price: ~$80.

Klipsch Image X10i

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Though the X10s were our favourite in-ears for years, the X10i now looks too pricey for the no.1 spot. Built-in iPod/iPhone controls are useful, but it’s the sound and size that really impress – the buds are slim as lolly sticks but sound thrilling and insightful. Price: ~$250.

Sennheiser CX300-II

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Thanks to amazing price reductions, the CX300-IIs represent even better value for money. Replace your bundled headphones with these and you’ll find out what you’ve been missing: deep bass, sparkling detail and dramatic dynamics. You’ll thank us later. Price: ~$60.

Powerbeats by Dr Dre

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We never had Dr Dre down as a fitness fan, but the headphones he’s designed for sweaty gym sessions are seriously impressive. Expect powerful, weighty and dynamic sound, then be pleasantly surprised by the in-line mic and three-button iPhone remote. Price: ~$300.

Ultimate Ears TripleFi 10vi

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Offering audio that’s full-bodied and punchy, with excellent levels of detail, the 10vis will stay firmly nestled in your lugholes thanks to a shapeable over-ear band. With phone controls on-hand , they’re a marvellous choice for affluent iPhone owners. Price: ~$600.

Bose QuietComfort 15

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Bose’s latest long-haul headphones are its finest yet. Wearing a pair is as comfortable as binding pillows to your head with silken thread, and both sound and noise cancelling are exemplary. For a louder, more rocking listen, try Monster’s Beats Studio. Price: ~$450.

Shure SE535

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Your eyes don’t deceive – that is how much Shure’s flagship three-driver IEMs cost. They look and feel it, though, with a thick, replaceable cable that attaches to the buds via articulated joints. And the sound? Unbelievably detailed, utterly uncompromising. Price: ~$750.

Sennheiser PX310 BT

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Here we have an excellent pair of noise-cancellers that are a significant step above ordinary budget headphones. Smooth, crisp and balanced sound along with Bluetooth capability and a powerful enough battery make this a winner. Price: ~$550.

AKG K701

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With a swanky headphone amp, these reference-quality , openbacked headphones create a sound to rival hi-fi speakers ten times the price. Got more dosh? Try the supremely revealing Sennheiser HD 800s or breathtaking Grado GS1000is. Price: ~$450.

What’s you best headphone, leave a comment in the comments section of this post.

In this peculiarly materialistic world, brands can become the object of quite passionate detestation. I confess that there are certain brands, usually for entirely irrational reasons, that make much of my bodily hair rebel against gravity. But the subject today is whether the Android brand attracts, at its core, not those who love Android, but those who hate Apple.

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I ask because the Business Insider published the results of a survey it conducted that offer some prickly conclusions. Among more than 2,000 respondents, the survey seems to have found polarization beyond all comments sections of tech blogs. The majority of these public-spirited people were Android users.

The majority of these Android users purportedly would never consider buying an iPhone, for one very simply reason: They “hate Apple.”
Indeed, only 31.2 percent of these Android users would consider buying an iPhone if it “worked better with non-iPhone apps and products.” While 55.7 percent ticked the box that said, “Nothing: I hate Apple.”

Being somewhat survey-cynical, I am guessing that the mere existence of a box that said “hate Apple” was far too difficult for some enthusiastic people to resist. But is it possible that one of the Android brand’s most compelling characteristics is its appeal to those who have an irrational (or merely rational) hate of Apple?

The Android brand is increasingly becoming “a brand.” The little green short-legged robot thingy is adorning stores, ads, and even dancing in a frenzied manner in shopping malls. See this Video 🙂

There are many who are happy with their Android phones, and, if this survey is to be believed, the majority of these people will upgrade only to another Android phone. But the results of this survey throw up a difficult conundrum: if the majority of Android users won’t buy Apple because of “hate,” then do they secretly believe that the iPhone is actually better than their own phone, but produced by a loathsome company?

One has to be also somewhat open-eyed about who responded to this survey.

The majority of respondents apparently said that the most important things for them when choosing a smartphone were “features” and “platform.” This seems remarkably left-brained and therefore remarkably inhuman. Which suggests that many of the respondents might have been tech-leaning insiders, rather than a true cross-section of the outside world.

I have a strange hunch that ease of use, simplicity of design and, yes, the cool factor might just enjoy prominent seats at the decision-making high table for many people. It’s harder in a survey to explain how a product is emotionally better, rather than rationally so. It’s easier to say that you just hate another brand. So it may well be that Android users believe their phones are easy to use, well-designed, and cool. But the survey may not have given them the chance to explain it.

It’s also tempting to conclude that if the Android brand really lives on a pedestal of Apple-loathing, then one can only wonder how many brands have ever had lengthy success purely by virtue of not being the “hated” brand. Do, for example, people stick with Verizon merely because it’s not AT&T? Or might there be some more positive notion?

Some believe that the iPhone succeeds simply because people assume it’s better and so don’t even try anything else. But wouldn’t it be lovely to learn why Android makes people happy, rather than this quaint and, frankly, suspicious notion that most of its users are card-carrying Apple-haters?

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Have you ever caught into the trouble of phone’s battery going low when you most needed it or you thought it will always stick to specifications provided by your phone manufacturers. Think again. Today’s smartphones have a multiplicity of applications and functions running in the background, many of them unnoticed by the user.

That is, until they drain the phone’s battery dry. At first, it’s not so easy to tell why one’s new top-level smartphone gives up the ghost after only two hours. But the fact of the matter is that, being online all the time has its price and some modern applications really do eat up battery time.

But, it doesn’t take much to let the good times roll again. A few simple tricks can turn a smartphone back into a marathon runner. Indeed, there are a few apps out there to help extend a phone’s life.

Screen illumination, satellite navigation systems like GPS (satnav) and data transfers via UMTS are among the most energy- intensive functions out there, says mobile expert and freelance author Daniel Lueders.

Thus, one easy way to conserve battery life is to change screen illumination settings to the lowest level, something done simply enough with most phones.

But that leaves accessing websites via UMTS and navigation programmes like Google Maps to eat up your battery life. One tip is to make sure that navigation software is turned off as soon as a destination’s coordinates are found. Otherwise, the mapping software can continue to run in the background, leaving a smartphone drained after two hours, says Lueders.

If you’re willing to only use a phone for calls, even if only for a short time, then deactivate your UMTS function. The same goes for wireless functions. “Otherwise the gadget is permanently looking for accessible networks,” says Lutz Labs, an editor at German technology magazine c’t.

Many smartphones that use the Android operating system include a page on their settings menu that shows which applications use the most energy. When underway, a good idea is just to switch to airplane mode, which turns off the satnav system, says Lueders. That’s especially true when travelling on a stretch with a lot of tunnels, since the smartphone will burn up a lot of energy looking for a provider.

“You can quickly double or triple your battery life with these kinds of steps.” Labs demonstrated how radically a smartphone’s power consumption can vary. In airplane mode, a Motorola Milestone used 6.4 milliwatts. But, when uploading data via UMTS and taking a video, power consumption shot up to 3 watts – meaning power usage went up by a factor of 500.

Even a five-minute activation of the display can cut standby time in airplane mode by up to six hours. It also happens that smartphones sometimes give up the ghost after only a few hours when taken abroad. Most of the time, this is because the smartphone is looking for its usual provider in vain, says Lueders.

That problem is solved by turning off the automatic search function and setting up a connection manually. Another idea is to turn off the automatic downloading of emails and manually direct the smartphone to download them, also saving energy.

There is also a host of new, smaller apps designed to help save energy. The free app Juice Defender provides Android phones with automatic settings designed to extend battery life, says Labs. The software determines if one is home or in the office and then activates functions based upon one’s location, turning off unneeded ones.

Here are more Tips to save your phone battery life:

Turn off all off all unnecessary sounds (keytones, alerts). One of my biggest pet peeves is how most phones these days come with keytones on. Do people really like hearing their phone beep, strum a musical note, or chime every time they press a button? You might like it, but ask your neighbor. Plus, turning these off will save you a good amount of battery juice. Think of all of the processing it must take to load up those midis (or whatever they are) when you touch a key – plus, they’re annoying.

Use either a ringer or vibrate, but not both. I understand if you’re in a concert or loud party you want to increase your chance of actually realizing your phone is ringing, but other than that, pick one or the other. There’s no need to have your ringer all the way to the point where it has both the sound and vibrate alerts active, so I would recommend against it. I personally have my phone on vibrate at all times, regardless of where I am. If you’re worried about not hearing your phone when it’s on vibrate, put it on a table and I promise you’ll hear it. Or better yet, put it in a dish full of coins!

Decrease your screen’s brightness to 50% or Use a black Background. Go to the settings menu of your phone and change the LCD brightness. At first, the screen will look dark, but once your eyes have adjusted to it, you’ll forget about it. The LCD screen on your phone is one of the biggest (if not THE biggest) power hogs on your phone. So turn it down, and you’re on your way to a lengthier battery life.

Turn your backlight setting down. Most phones these days will allow you to adjust the amount of time your backlight stays on once you’ve stopped touching buttons. The default length on most phones is probably around 15-30 seconds, but there are settings that are much lower. I would suggest turning this down to 3-5 seconds to increase your battery life. If it starts annoying you, then just crank it back up. Note: Mine backlight is set to go off after 5 seconds and it doesn’t bother me at all.

Turn off Bluetooth when you’re not using it. This can be an easy one to forget about if you’re often switching between using a Bluetooth headset, and the phone’s ear piece. Turning the Bluetooth off when you’re not using it will save your phone from having to go out and check if the headset is there every few seconds. Any type of transmission will weigh-down your battery life, so if you use infrared, turn that off when you’re not using it as well.

Close applications when you’re not using them. This one only affects those of us that have smartphones. Why do you need to keep that game on pause when you’re not using it? Or pocket Excel open? Just save and close them and you’ll minimize the amount of battery waste.
Keep your phone in cool climates. I know most of the time you won’t have a choice where to keep your phone – since it goes with you at all times. But when you do have a choice – such as when you’re at home – don’t put your phone on the hot stove, or on your super hot MacBook Pro or anything like that. Also, don’t keep your phone in a hot car. If you have extra batteries for your phone, go ahead and store those in the refrigerator – but make sure not to freeze them. BatteryUniversity recomments storing them at a 40% charge for best results.

When you’re phone is done charging, unplug it! There’s a common myth that you can over-charge your battery if you leave it plugged in. According to BatteryUniversity, “Once the battery is fully charged, no further charge is applied.” So if no further charge is applied, then why do you need to unplug your phone? You want to protect your battery from heat, that’s why. When the phone is running off of AC for a long time, extended heat may hurt the battery.

Avoid over heating of the battery to prevent damage to the mobile phone and to the battery. Keep your phone away from the direct Sun heat and any other radiations. Your phone battery works fine in the temperature range of 10 – 35 C.

Don’t let your battery fully discharge. If you let your battery die frequently, you’re putting extra strain on the battery. Avoid this by plugging in your phone before it dies all the way.

Don’t do anything fun on your phone. I mentioned this above, but I’m serious here. If you have fun on your phone, your battery life will dramatically decrease. Accessing the web, playing games, navigating via GPS and capturing photos or video are not things to do while you’re in the middle of nowhere without a charger.

Use One SIM Only Mobiles: The reason not being still clear why a single SIM mobile uses lesser energy than a dual SIM phone, which by using logic, I believe, will depend on the number of times that you switch between the SIMs. This transformation is a task that will use both software and hardware changes, which might be the reason for more power consumption. So always use single sim only mobiles for longer battery life!

With 2011 touted as the year of the tablet, the tablet war has begun with Apple unveiling iPad2 and BlackBerry-maker Research In Motion (RIM)speculated to be following soon with its PlayBook. Here’s is my point of view on how Apple Inc’s iPad 2, stacks up against iPad 1 and competing tablets, with just simple features and less jargons so everyone can understand with a scroll :0.

Apple iPad 2

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* Price: $499-$829

* Camera: Has front and rear-facing camera, Sports a magnetic cover

* Weight: 1.33 lbs (603gm)

* Screen: 9.7 inches LED display; width: 7.3 inches; depth: 0.34 inches

* Processor & OS: Runs on 1GHz dual-core A5 processor, iOS 4.3

* Availablity: March 11

Apple iPad

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* Price: $399-$729

* Weight: 1.5 lbs (680gm)

* Screen: 9.7 inches LED display, width: 7.5 inches, depth: 0.5 inches

* Processor & OS: Runs on 1GHz A4 processor

Motorola Mobility Xoom

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* Software: Android

* Weight: 1.6 lbs (725gm)

* Camera: Has a 2 MP front-facing camera for video calls and a 5 MP rear camera that takes still photos and captures high-definition video.

* Screen: 10.1 inches diagonally; width: 6.6 inches; depth: 0.5 inches

* Processor & OS: Runs on 1GHz Dual Core processor with Android 3.0 Honeycomb

* Availability: Since February

* Price: $600-$799

Research In Motion PlayBook

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* Screen: 7 inches display; width 7.6 inches, depth 0.4 inches

* Weight 0.9 lbs (408 gm)

* Camera: Dual camera, 3 MP camera in the front, 5 MP camera at the back

* Processor & OS: Runs on 1 GHz dual-core processor with BlackBerry OS

* Price: To be announced

* Availablity: March likely

LG Optimus Pad

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* Weight: 630 grams

* Screen: 8.9 inches display

* Processor & OS: 1GHz NvidiaTegra 2 dual-core processor, runs on Android 3.0

* Camera: Two separate cameras on the back for shooting 3D video. A 2 MP camera on front for conferencing.

* Price: To be announced

* Availability: Middle of March

Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1

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* Screen: 10.1 inches display

* Weight: 1.3 lbs (589gm)

* Camera: Front- and rear-facing cameras

* Processor & OS: Runs on 1 GHz dual-core processor with Android 3.0 Honeycomb

* Price: To be announced

* Availability: March

HP TouchPad

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* Screen: 9.7 inches multitouch screen

* Weight: 1.6 pounds (0.7 kg)

* Camera: There’s a front-facing 1.3 MP camera for video calling. However, there is no camera on the back panel.

* Processor & OS: Qualcomm Snapdragon dual-CPU APQ8060 1.2-GHz processor; will be the first to use WebOS OS which HP got when it acquired Palm.

Price: To be announced

Availability: Middle of the year likely